Sunday, March 12, 2017

Tainted Love: Another Marichal No-Hitter! : Friday, August 8th, 1969

Scores

ATL 5, NY 0  W-P.Niekro 13-9 L-Seaver 10-10  HR-Carty(18) 

NY 7, ATL 5  W-Taylor 5-3 L-Upshaw 5-5  S-McGraw(19)  HR-Clendenon(19) Cepeda(15)

PHI 4, CIN 2  W-Wise 9-9 L-Merritt 7-13  HR-Taylor(3) Perez(18)

HOU 7, MON 3  W-Dierker 12-10 L-Jaster 7-9  HR-Laboy(16)

LA 7, CHI 5 (10inns)  W-Brewer 3-4 L-Regan 5-5  HR-Williams(12) Santo(18) Banks(9) Hundley(8) Davis(12) Miller(1)ph GW

SD 3, PIT 2 (10inns)  W-Kirby 3-13 L-Gibbon 4-6  HR-Brown(11)  Arcia walk-off single.

SF 2, STL 0  W-Marichal 13-9 L-Gibson 15-4  HR-McCovey(21)  Marichal no-hitter.


As the spirit of yet-unborn Armando Galarraga floated around Candlestick Park hoping the breaks would one day go his way (they wouldn't), Juan Marichal of the Giants tossed his second no hitter of the '69 campaign, 2-0 over the Cardinals. He also no-hit the Astros at the Stick exactly one month ago, to begin his current streak of winning seven straight decisions after starting the season 6-9, mostly due to lack of support.  He mowed down the Redbirds, allowing just a pair of walks to center fielder Curt Flood. (Look, reader Thomas! Cardinal walks!) But there was controversy in the top of the 6th inning, and as usual, umpire "Hell" Enkeller was in the middle of it. Pitcher Bob Gibson hit what appeared to be a base hit down the left field line, but Enkeller waved his arms furiously, signalling that the ball was foul. Gibson expressed numerous pleasantries toward Mr. Enkeller, detailing concern for his vision, his mental stability, and his lineage, but the call stood, and Gibson eventually struck out, giving Enkeller a long look as he strode back to the dugout. Later in the game, Willie Mays made a circus catch to preserve the gem.

(Okay, that's the official version. But it might be that your early morning Goddess rolled for the wrong man, Gibson, when it should have been number 8 hitter Dal Maxvill. It happens, and my rule is that if the inning has been completed, the plays stand, but if I catch it during an inning, as i did here, the at-bats are erased and re-rolled. As soon as Gibson rolled his 25-10 for a single, I looked at the sheet and realized what had happened. And so, Maxvill batted, as he should have, and flied out, Gibson fanned, and Brock was retired, preserving the no-no.) It was at least my 28th no-hitter ever (I didn't keep a record of no-hitters in my first--1979--replay, but know that I had at least one, and there have been 27 more since. The most notable was Whitlow Wyatt of the Brooklyn Dodgers throwing THREE in my 1941 NL replay. He got the Reds twice and the Cardinals for the third; the last two were consecutive starts in September. Anyway, the high-kicking Dominican, Mr. Marichal, has used up all the lucky karma that might have been yours some day, Armando!

The guy in the middle. Yes, really.
In other action, the Dodgers annoyed your Most Serene Goddess by coming back from a 5-2 deficit to beat the Cubs and draw to within a half game of the Braves. If the Dodgers win the pennant in this replay, your Impartial Goddess will burn their team packet in the back yard. They are my least favorite team out of the twelve. The Cubs blasted 4 homers, but Fergie Jenkins couldn't hold the lead. The Tinseltown nine plated single runs in the 7th, 8th, and 9th to tie it. Then little-used reserve utility fuck Johnny Miller stepped up and launched a two-run two-out game-winning pinch hit homer to win it for Los Angeles. Jeepers creepers, Johnny. Really? It was his first of the year. 

"Watch me smack a three-bagger!"
At Atlanta, the Braves had dispatched the Mets 5-0 in the opener, and were leading them by the same score in the nightcap after 6 innings. (In the opener, things got so out of hand that Phil Niekro stole second as Sonny Jackson stole home. Knucksie stood on second base laughing at the inept Metropolitans.) The Mets looked completely lifeless and doomed to be swept. But wait! Disappointing Donn Clendenon smacked a two-run shot, and that led to the New Yorkers scoring 7 runs in the final 3 frames to take the second game 7-5. The last 5 were scored off of Atlanta ace reliever Cecil Upshaw. Wow. The big blow was a pinch triple by...wait for it...Duffy Dyer. Hoo-wee.  

"I won! Wait, no I didn't! Wait, yes I did!"
Finally, the Buccos rolled into San Diego missing Willie Stargell, Al Oliver, Jose Pagan, Carl Taylor and Ron Davis, and with Gene Alley restricted to pinch hitting chores. They did get Richie Hebner back though, and he even dug himself out of his own grave! This left the Corsairs with Jose Martinez playing left and kid bench-warmer Bob Robertson at first. Bob may be good next year, but this year not so much. So anyway, Clay Kirby and Dock Ellis hooked up in a scoreless duel until the bottom of the 8th, when Ollie Brown crushed a 2-run homer that seemd to salt it away for the Pods. But not so fast! The Buccos tied it up in the top of the ninth! Kirby labored on through the 10th in search of his first win since May, and was rewarded when Jose Arcia hit a 1-out game-winning safety to score Tommy Dean (also shown on John Miller's rookie card, above) with the deciding tally. It broke the Friars' six game losing streak. 

Some post-game music for Misters Marichal, Gibson, and Enkeller:

1 comment:

stevemryan said...

At least the Cards lost, the no-no just made it a tad sweeter.